Experimenting with Contrast paint

I haven’t said anything about contrast at all on my blog, that is until now. I was sceptical about this paint since it was first revealed at Warhammer fest, was it really as good as they say it is?

After watching a couple of Warhammer community videos, pro painter opinions and photos of the finished products, I had some hope. A paint that can give both the recess shade and base colour in one coat.

However, I was unsure about the paints as when images came up on painted Primaris Space Marines in various colours, the models looked very patchy in pool dry marks. Kinda defeats the purpose of a one coat paint if it looks like pooled mess.

When I finally got my contrast paint today, I did some experiments to see what kind of results I can get from this new Citadel paint.

I used Nazdreg yellow contrast for all of my experiments, using Grey Seer Basecoat, Model Colour foundation white as a Basecoat and for drybrushing.

Here’s what I’ve learnt.

First my first experiment I used a Tyranid Gargoyle as they have many surfaces to test our contrast, from deep recesses, details and flat areas. I started my painting by using Grey Seer as a basecoat (three coats) then I applied Nazdreg yellow over the model. This resulted in a patchy look just like the Primaris Space marine pictures from Warhammer Fest.

Despite this, I then highlighted the model in Model Colour Foundation White, making it look nearly like a none metallic gold look.

For the left side of the wings, I used Leadbelcher as a basecoat, then I applied Nazdreg yellow over it. This surprisingly looked really cool, like a gold tint that could be useful for future painting work. On the right carapace side I used the contrast paint again over the first layer and the white highlight. Resulting in a darker gold yellow tone whilst retaining the edge highlight Which you can see below. It’s similar to how AoS studio manager, Jes Bickham, painted his Tyranid army (I think it was called Hive Epemedis?) using mustard yellow colours for the carapace.

From this second contrast application an idea formed in my head, why not use Grey Seer as a Basecoat and drybrush Model Colour Foundation white? Here’s what the results were.

You’ll notice that the raised areas are more lighter yellow, whilst some areas are darker that haven’t been drybrushed in white. It works well for scales which has shading, base colour and highlights all in one application of contrast.

With this test of using white pant for contrast I did one more experiment using both Grey Seer and Foundation white on two sides of a Space marine.

The pooling problem was less noticeable on the lighter side than the Grey Seer basecoat. Left side was fine in foundation white whilst the right side was done in Grey Seer.

Contrast paint using Grey Seer basecoat.

Contrast paint using Model Colour Foundation White.

I think using Foundation white for Nazdreg yellow contrast would be really beneficial for painters who find it hard painting Bad Moons and Imperial Fist armies. It’s a one coat solution to a process that would take a long time to paint, but contrast has proven, to me at least, that this is no longer an issue.

That’s all I have for today. This isn’t a review on contrast paint as I think it’ll take some time to form an informative review on contrast paints. There’s still a lot of experimentation to try out, even pro painters are coming up with new stuff every day using contrast paints. I’ve heard that the Alpha Legion contrast method is a favourite in my local GW store that I overheard from the manager.

I hope this post serves as an inspiration or an informative look at how contrast paint works. If you like what you see and want more contrast posts, post a comment below and I’ll continue to experiment even more!

Until next time,

-Bjorn

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The Jester and the Knight

This week I’ve found two Codex’s at two far away locations in the same city, how weird is that? Well, by Tzeentch’s many webs of plots and events, I found both Imperial Knights (7th ed) and Codex Eldar: Harlequins (7th ed) in pretty good condition.

It’s weird, why do I keep finding these things when I’m not looking for them? For two fairly recent publications to be in second hand shops is rare. Rouge Trader was still on display at an expensive cost of £45, no one’s taking that book anytime soon.

There were some other Codex’s, but they weren’t that interesting for me, I’ll let someone else take the Grey Knights and Tyranids………..

What’s odd is the pricing. So when I got the Imperial Knights Codex it costed £3.65, a massive reduction compared to the Rouge Trader book which was £45, and a Forge World book I saw that was roughly £15 est. in fact most of the Codex’s I’ve seen were at the same price apart from one or two that were £4.35 est.

Now at another location in the same city, the Harlequins Codex was £1.45, the condition was great apart from some small dent marks that aren’t really noticeable on the front cover. Although, the shop last year did have an 8th edition Orks and Goblins army book at £12.50 and a Warmachine faction book at £22.

I have no idea why these second hand charity shops price the books for a fairly decent price cut, considering these are not that old from publication. I’m grateful don’t get me wrong, but I’m curious to know why the prices have dropped so much for second hand.

Lately I’ve been reading some old Warhammer 40k lore (I think it was 3rd or 4th edition Imperialis book?) on the Adeptus Arbites, the law and order of the Imperium. I wish GW would release some plastic judges so I can make a Kill Team, based on the Judges from the Judge Dredd universe. Just imagine it, a squad of law enforcement going against a Genestealer cult in the Crypts of a Hive city.

Anyways, that’s all I have for today. I might have more to show soon, depending on wether the charity shops still have some Codex left for me to hunt down (no promises).

until next time,

-Bjorn

Let’s get ready to Waaaaaagggghhh!!!

Another visit to a carboot sale, another new finding! This time it’s all about da greenskins with Gorkamorka Da Uvver Book.

As an Ork collector, who amassed a Bad Moons Tribe army last year, this book is a real treat! There’s lore and background, campaign rules, modelling ideas and extra stuff too!

I’m keen to learn more about Gorkamorka and how to play it, as It could be a good afternoon game with an opponent on a rainy day. You don’t need a lot of models to play Gorkamorka, just a few models, a leader (Ork Nob) and a few vehicles.

Sadly, the basic rules were in a separate book and I couldn’t find it at the carboot stall. So I can’t really play Gotkamorka unless I can find a copy of the rules.

Some of my Bad Moons Tribe Units that I did last year, which can be used in Gorkamorka!

I’m still reading through the book learning about how the Orks crash landed on Angelis on a Space Hulk, and how the Orks started to build crazy stuff to fly back into space.

There are a lot of fun stuff in this book including some creative inspirations on how to modify your Trukk, Trakk and other vehicles. No planes sadly, but that’s because Ork planes didn’t became a physical miniature until a decade or two later.

That’s it for today, I’m going back to work painting an Exalted Chaos Champion of Khorne (Slaves to Darkness) and painting a Troggoth King.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Yearly book reading challenge update and the Prince Corum book series

Back in April I’ve posted an update on my yearly book reading challenge, after reading a total of twelve books last year, I wanted to best that record by reading more books. Below is a recap list of what I read this year.

  • The Rats, by James Herbert
  • Lair, by James Herbert
  • Domain, by James Herbert
  • Chacarodons: The Outer Dark, by Robbie Mcniven
  • The Horus Heresy: Galaxy in Flames, by Ben Counter
  • The Horus Heresy: Crimson Fist, by John French
  • Nagash: The Undying King, by Josh Reynolds
  • Legacy of Dorn, by Mike Lee
  • Elric of Melniboné, by Michael Moorcock
  • A knight and his horse, by Ewart Oakshott

Today I can announce (a late one) that I’ve now passed my goal, with six more books read! This year I have so far read 16 books, three of which are part of a trilogy of books. Below is a list of what I’ve read since April’s update post.

  • The Knight of the Sword, by Micheal Moorcock
  • The Queen of the Sword, by Micheal Moorcock
  • The King of the Sword, by Micheal Moorcock
  • The Land Leviathan (the Oswald Bastable trilogy), by Micheal Moorcock
  • The Dark Powers of Tolkien, by David Day
  • The Fog, by James Herbert

The first trilogy in the Corum series written by Micheal Moorcock.

So now that my goal has been met, I’m going to read some more books and see how far I can go before the end of 2019.

After reading the Sword Rulers trilogy by Micheal Moorcock, I was really inspired by the story and creations by Micheal, a fun and interesting series relating to the multiverse. I think it’s a series that’s hardly been talked about with today’s generation (including me for a time before I found out about Micheal Moorcock). I’ve got an idea that I’ve been working on for weeks now, that will hopefully attract more new readers to the Corum series and other Micheal Moorcock books……

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Chaos Siege Giant (Khorne), The Skullfiend Tribe Collection

Yesterday I showed a WIP if my substitute Chaos Siege Giant, and sharing my thoughts on it. Now that the model is finally done, I can show you guys the final result of my 7-8 hours of kitbashing and painting this model. Enjoy!

I’ve also got five Chaos knights painted too!

All that’s left are my 20x Bloodreavers………not an exciting task to be honest. But… I’ve been curious about the D&D Wizkid model range and seeing what models they have that could fit into substituting units. I’m thinking of either having a unit of three Chaos trolls (and one spare model as a Troll king maybe?), 3x Chaos Ogres or anything else worth substituting and kitbashing Khorne bitz.

More skulls for the skull deck chair!

-Bjorn

WIP Chaos Siege Giant

Well, this was an unexpected but certainly worth the change! Originally I had planned to kitbash a Bloodthirster using the Fire Giant model from the D&D Wizkid model range. The wings I had spare didn’t look right when I was choosing the bitz to test out, the Exalted Daemon theme wasn’t going to work for this model.

After looking around the Warscroll app for inspiration, I came across the Chaos Siege Giant, a perfect fit for my armoured giant model! So I did some kitbashing to give the model a ‘Warhammer AoS’ aesthetic to make it look as though it would fit with the rest of the collection.

This is what I ended up creating as a result……..

Looks stunning, just jaw dropping for me to be honest. For just £15 this model is pretty decent to use as a substitute model. However, since it’s monopose and has the issue of bent parts (same as with any model in this range by D&D Wizkid range) that’s a drawback that can be seen. I can’t fix the issue as I’m very inexperienced at readjusting parts, so I’ll make some sort of excuse that it’s a bent weapon.

This Giant is what I call a ‘Magmadroth Slayer’, a Chaos Siege Giant who wears the hide of a slain Magmadroth and improvised it as armour.

Maybe I’ve been playing too much Dark Souls, but this model would look just right as a mini boss for the game. I’m pretty glad I got this model as it’s a great template for any Giant model to kitbash.

I’ll be posting the finished result very soon!

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Slaughterpriestess and Aspiring Slaughterpriestess

My final two Gorechosen are here, this time being two substitute Slaughterpriests using D&D Wizkid kit of a Hag and a Death Hag. I really liked the Death Hag model as it fits perfectly as a female Slaughterpriest, a tall, evil, bloody and ruthless priest holding up her prize.

The Hag whilst being very small in scale looked equally menacing, although I might use her for something else if I decided to do a Chaos Dwarf as my eighth Gorechosen instead. But for now I’ll use her as the eighth Gorechosen, an Aspiring Slaughterpriestess as I’d like to call her.

Recently I’ve decided to do a unit of 5x Chaos Knights instead of 6x Skullcrushers as I’ve got a decent small pool of Slaves to Darkness including a unit of Khorne Chaos Warriors and a Warshrine of Khorne. So having a unit of Chaos Knights will fit into a small but diverse allies to the Bloodbound of Khorne. If I do get a kit of two Dwarfs from Wizkid D&D, I might make one a Slaughterpriest/ or Aspiring Deathbringer and the other as a Sorcerer/ or Chaos Lord. Then at least my Slaves to Darkness have a leader of sorts.

As mentioned earlier, I’m working on my 5x Chaos Knights that I’m painting WIP, I’ve still got to paint 20x Bloodreavers (if only contrast paints existed a year ago….) and finally I might possibly substitute a D&D Wizkid Giant model into a Bloodthister of Khorne.

Until next time,

-Bjorn