Roboute Guilliman, art project

You thought I would forget Lorgar’s arch nemesis? Well, I did just that earlier than expected, it’s a nice picture that I’ll be using as my new profile picture.

At first I wanted to draw Rogal Dorn, but I found the drawing to be less like Dorn and more like Guilliman. So I went for a stoic Guilliman in uniform. Can you guess which famous actor I’ve picked as a visual reference for drawing Roboute?

That’s all for today, until next time,

-Bjorn

Lorgar, Bearer of the Word: Art project

The other day I wanted to do some drawing, so I got out my sketchbook out and started planning what I wanted to draw. After my test drawing of Perturabo using a reference photo impressed me, I wanted to do something similar for this drawing.

I wanted to draw Lorgar, inspired by ADB Horus Heresy book, Betrayer, which I finished reading a few days ago. Hating Lorgar more than ever, I wanted to create a very powerful, wise, prideful and twisted imagery of the Primarch.

To start off, I went and searched for a reference image of who I wanted to base the XVIIth Primarch on. When I read Lorgar’s words, I imagine Richard E Grant playing as the character for his soft high gothic voice, with a twist of sharpness when the monster within is unleashed.

What better reference picture than one of Richards roles that I first saw him in when I was a kid, The little Vampire. I can’t show the image on here, but it’s a good reference picture of him smiling sinisterly with his Vampire costume and makeup. I’ve also got some reference photos of Lorgar, one from his Primarch book and another one in full chaos mode (I think it’s the same artist who did Chapter Master Valrak’s YouTube profile picture?).

Rather than using a pencil, I used a red pencil when outlining and shading the portrait, something I haven’t tried out before until now. As they say in Art College, try something new and out of your comfort zone.

Using a red pencil/crayon, I’ve noticed it was a lot more smoother to shade the picture. With a chalk tip/graphite pencil I tend to get too rough on the shading and outlining.
Once the sketch is complete, I did some photo editing to make it sharper, brighter and filtered in B&W. But wait, the face doesn’t look right…….I keep thinking I’ve accidentally drawn Gav Thorpe, despite the fact I’ve used a reference photo of Richard E Grant.

Now for the digital art stage! With the photo ready, importing it into Procreate art app to be put through layers of colour and editing. I tend to add separate layers for different areas like for example Skin, eyes, armour, background, added effects and tonal change.

Already Lorgar looks as bright as a neutron star about to explode, just like Monarchia……..
He’s even got a nice scar left by Corax after their clash on Istvaan V, a mark of prowess or shame, who could say?

After the painting stages are done, it’s back to the photo editing with light balance and another filter. We need to make Lorgar look his best, so a really dark and morbid tone should suit his ‘killing smile’.

Some may not like it too dark, me, for this art subject in particular, it’s justifiable. #RIPArgalTal #FErebus

Finally, I wanted to add one final effect before it goes into its final piece stage. Adding some nebula glow to represent the almost otherworldly aspect to Lorgar’s deep descent into Chaos.

With that done, what’s the message in my art work and what inspired me.

Artwork’s message and meaning

Art is subject and everyone has their take on the subject in question, so don’t let my words be the final judgment on your views.

I wanted the picture to represent Lorgar as the serpent, the smiling demigod who’s pulling the threads of many plans and religious founding during his zealous crusade in the Horus Heresy. I’ve noticed in many official and fan artworks how Lorgar doesn’t smile, despite the fact that he smiles a little bit too much.

Once, he was the runt of the herd whom no one respected or even acknowledged, even to his own brothers of demigods. But after all the events that transpired leading up towards the Heresy, we get to see Lorgar at the height of his power, and his greatest weaknesses open to be exploited by the Chaos Pantheon.

My artwork was set with one goal in mind for my target audience, and that is for them to hate it. Why? Because what your seeing is no mere victim or a misguided demigod seeking the truth, what your seeing is the truth. Chaos corrupts all it touches, even best intentions for good can be set for a pathway to damnation. Lorgar is an example of someone who plays the victim and expects people to see his point of view because he saw the “truth”, how the Emperor is nothing but a false god along with the Imperium that he created.

But that’s his excuse. He knew the cost of his actions when he sent Argal Tal and his chapter into hells gate, he knew what the Heresy would result in, he knew Guilliman would seek his head for the burning of Calth as he was about to play victim to the XIIIth Primarch. He means good intentions, but only to himself, if he ever cared for his sons and the rest of humanity, he would’ve searched deep within himself and be more self assertive. But because he needs to worship something greater than himself, he can never question himself.

Even a demigod like Lorgar can be manipulated by mortals like Erebus and Kor Pharon, who use Lorgar to their own agendas because he cannot see his own faults to know he’s being used. Or are we the reader being fooled? Lorgar for all we know is playing victim to his own sons, letting them think he’s too dependable on others to be guided. But in truth, he’s using them in such a way where he can see what their motives are, who’s really the ally and enemy within.

My artwork in my opinion is about the truth of who we are, not the universal truth. The truth that Lorgar seeks is not the masters we must follow, but it is the actions we make that define our lives and those we affect. Lorgar is so hellbent of finding the truth of real gods to pray and grovel over to because he wants no responsibility for himself. Why be the master of your own destiny when gods can be both a source of power, religious guidance and an excusable diversion for your own sins (blame the gods for my actions).

One day the gods will tire of Lorgar and find a new plaything. On that day he will truly know the meaning of guilt and despair far more crushingly than the burning of Monarchia

Inspiration

My inspirations for this piece as mentioned above are Richard E Grant as an actor/ voice actor I’d imagine would play as Lorgar. imagery of GW IP artwork of Lorgar and fan artwork of Lorgar.

For reading inspiration from Black Library includes Gav Thorpe for Lorgar’s Primarch book, Anthony Reynolds for The Purge and Scion of the Storm and ADB for The First Heretic, Betrayer and short stories relating to Lorgar.

Finally, artist inspirations are Francis Bacon, Neil Roberts and Paul Dainton.

That is all for today. I hope you have enjoyed this post, and if your have any suggestions on which Primarch I should do next, post a comment in this post on who you’d like to nominate for me to ruin.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Watch the skies!

Swooping down from the darkness of a starless sky, an aircraft in the colours of the 8th Legion ignites its two big flamers. Engineered by the Dark Mechanicum Warpsmiths in their hellforges, this aircraft’s role is to cause terror and pyroclast its victims in promethian fire. The Night Lords favour this for taking down the weak and defenceless targets, in cities where they can shepherd the citizens in dead ends.

They call this the Vulture Talon, a suitable name for it’s use as a terror that waits for the time to strike the weak.

Vulture Talon, Curze’s Talons

Joining the Night Lords are two ancient and evil machines of an age of darkness, not seen since the days of the Horus Heresy. In that dreadful time in Imperial history there was once a knight house called Devine, once serving the cause of the Great Crusade now turned to the whims of Slannesh.

It is a great boon to have Renegade Knights on your side, even if it’s only two Armigers at your disposal. For such power cannot be denied when these machines of such size and scale will inspire and terrify friend and foe. A greater boon it is if you pay the offering to an ancient and well known Knight House like Devine, for reputation and deep rooted history will certainly make your leadership undisputed to other backstabbing warlords.

But to deploy these god machines is at a risk far greater than death, for the Renegade Knight houses do not accept charity or call for need. They require an offering, sacrifices to the Chaos Gods (or chosen god) in order to lend their arms to war. Thousands of souls or fresh vessels are required to satisfy these throne bound carcasses, their long dead bodies bound to the machine still live and breath from the sacrifices to feed their hatred.

Some pacts may secretly involve the Warlords own soul as an offering in payment, wether by death in battle or by failure, no Knight would want their reputation mired by such loss by being on the losing side. Think of it as insurance for the machine spirit to be satisfied, or the Daemon possessing the Renegade Knight. Armiger Knights Harrixi and Lexia of House Devine

Sometimes a Renegade Knight house will have willing peasants or followers of Hive military join them on the contract. They serve only as playthings of the Knights who only see them as distraction units, entertained by the wanton death and destruction their followers cause. No strategic value is used when deploying these insane peasant, just a pathetic excuse for House Devine to cause the killing blow by laziness and luxury. Peasant flock Alpha

That’s all for today, I’ll be back soon with more Night Lords to show that’ll probably give you long term nightmares of bats.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Yearly book reading challenge update and the Prince Corum book series

Back in April I’ve posted an update on my yearly book reading challenge, after reading a total of twelve books last year, I wanted to best that record by reading more books. Below is a recap list of what I read this year.

  • The Rats, by James Herbert
  • Lair, by James Herbert
  • Domain, by James Herbert
  • Chacarodons: The Outer Dark, by Robbie Mcniven
  • The Horus Heresy: Galaxy in Flames, by Ben Counter
  • The Horus Heresy: Crimson Fist, by John French
  • Nagash: The Undying King, by Josh Reynolds
  • Legacy of Dorn, by Mike Lee
  • Elric of Melniboné, by Michael Moorcock
  • A knight and his horse, by Ewart Oakshott

Today I can announce (a late one) that I’ve now passed my goal, with six more books read! This year I have so far read 16 books, three of which are part of a trilogy of books. Below is a list of what I’ve read since April’s update post.

  • The Knight of the Sword, by Micheal Moorcock
  • The Queen of the Sword, by Micheal Moorcock
  • The King of the Sword, by Micheal Moorcock
  • The Land Leviathan (the Oswald Bastable trilogy), by Micheal Moorcock
  • The Dark Powers of Tolkien, by David Day
  • The Fog, by James Herbert

The first trilogy in the Corum series written by Micheal Moorcock.

So now that my goal has been met, I’m going to read some more books and see how far I can go before the end of 2019.

After reading the Sword Rulers trilogy by Micheal Moorcock, I was really inspired by the story and creations by Micheal, a fun and interesting series relating to the multiverse. I think it’s a series that’s hardly been talked about with today’s generation (including me for a time before I found out about Micheal Moorcock). I’ve got an idea that I’ve been working on for weeks now, that will hopefully attract more new readers to the Corum series and other Micheal Moorcock books……

Until next time,

-Bjorn

12 days of Winter: day five, False Gods and serpents (just my thoughts)

I mentioned in day three on my tribute model on the sons of Horus how I was inspired by the Horus Heresy books. I took inspiration from various books relating to the Sons of Horus including Horus Rising, Vengeful Spirit and various short stories in the series.

Recently I read Graham McNeil’s first book in the series, False Gods, a continuation from Horus Rising following the aftermath of the genocide of Interex. The story really caught my attention with lots of questions about the Emperor and his “Great Crusade”, religion and how things could have gone if Horus acted differently to the events that take place.

Having read Erebus in other books (a majority of books I own has Erebus in it, and most are Word Bearers story!), I was intrigued to learn how he enacted the downfall of Horus with the help of the Serpent Lodge. I was almost glad when Akshub killed him, it was good to finally see the old wretch get what he deserves after all the terrible things he’s done. But alas, the First Chaplin survives and the rest is history.

What interested me was how Graham McNeil interwove religious and historical myths on snakes, and how they are portrayed by human cultures. What would be said by Kyrle Sinderman about what the serpent represents would be shocking when everything starts to align, even the revelation has not yet really dawned on Loken, the protagonist of the story, just how dire Horus’s resurrection would spell for the galaxy.

There’s an interesting part of the story where the Sons of Horus meet a human world that is to be in compliance, with peaceful arrangement to discuss relations. What’s fascinating is that the Brotherhood, the armed forces of the planet, share nearly the same power armour design as the Sons of Horus. This is strange as the civilisation of this world hasn’t made contact with outside communication for many decades. Now the military do pale in contrast to the Astartes due to being biologically enhanced, but nevertheless appear very much like their brethren.

The mystery as to why they look the same is unclear, but their wealth of STC templates were very promising to the 63rd expedition and Horus’s own Mechanicum expert, Regulus. Shame any good will was established since Horus thought putting a bullet to the Brotherhoods ambassador was a good idea!

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel with an engaging story that really asks a lot of questions, and very few answers. I’ve got a lot of inspirational ideas from reading this book, including my own tribute to the Sons of Horus with my display model (you can find that on day three in this years 12 days of Winter!). Im currently stuck between making a tribute piece on Legio Mortis using AT Titan miniatures or Primaris sized tribute models of the Mornival.

Either way, I’m getting back into painting something new thanks to this inspiring book. The Horus Heresy book series has been a long line of stories that really expands the universe of Warhammer 30k, not all of the stories are perfect, but on the whole it’s great Sci-Fi historical journey!

Preparing and Painting Jago ‘sevatar’ Sevatarion, 1st Captain of the Night Lords Legion (part 2 of 2)

Today, I’ll be presenting part two of my painting work on 1st Captain Sevatar of the Night Lords Legion, this time focusing on his diorama base.

I’ve had to delay this post due to distractions of late, so I needed this post done before I go on to my new army project. For my first every resin kit I thought it went really well, and I was glad to have been able to paint a pretty decent model.

The diorama represents Sevatar as he fights against the Dark Angels, slaying one marine below him. I can’t remember what the engagement was in HH (Tharamas Crusade?), but I thought it would be awesome to paint 30k Dark Angels as a little experiment.

Now that Sevatar is complete (over month now), I’m keen to add one or two more HH character series models for my display case. It’ll be either Conrad Curze, Perturabo, Lorgar, Jaghati Khan (when released) and Shiban, Khan of the Brotherhood of the Storm (if FW ever decided to sculpt him). I’m not planning to build a 30k army collection due to the current uncertainty of FW’s HH series and the prices (its even more expensive than GW).

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I hope you guys have enjoyed these two posts on Sevatar, and if you would like me to do more HH model posts or FW related items, comment below and I might do a post in the future.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Preparing and Painting Jago ‘sevatar’ Sevatarion, 1st Captain of the Night Lords Legion (part 1 of 2)

Preparing and Painting Jago ‘sevatar’ Sevatarion, 1st Captain of the Night Lords Legion (part 1 of 2)

After five days (18th April) of getting this model cleaned, glued, primed and painted, I was finally able to finish it with arguably one of my best painted models to date. Originally I was planning on taking my time painting this model, but I got too invested in painting it with a lot of enthusiasm.

Recently, I’ve purchased my first Forge World kit from Warhammer World from the HH section. There were a few characters to choose from but unfortunately my budget was limited, so I had to choose between Alexis Pollux or Sevatar. I went for Sevatar as I’ve read more about him than Alexis in the fiction of HH, I liked his story in ‘The Prince of Crows’ (by Aaron Dembski Bowden).

The kit itself is a gorgeously detailed mini diorama featuring the convict himself, Sevatar and a fallen marine in a bloody mess (I’ll mention which legion I’ve painted for this poor fellow later on). Whilst plastic kits by GW are fantastic with details and textures by today’s standards, FW kits on the other hand really show their crispy details and exquisite sculpting.

Before I painted my first resin kit, I’d decided to watch video guides on how to prepare Forge World kits. My main two sources of guidance was the Forge World kit preparation leaflet included in the kit, and a YouTuber by the name of Leakycheese. A man of experience with a wealth of useful tips and guidance on preparing resin kits, he’s a great source of help for newcomers. I have a link to his YouTube channel below if your interested to see his videos:

https://www.youtube.com/user/leakycheese

Preparing the resin kit

Like all resin models, before assembling and glueing is done, I had to check if all of the parts were in the box as well as the condition of the pieces. Luckily for my kit there were no moulding problems and major warping issues (apart from the dagger and staff).

Again, I’d recommend watching Leakycheese’s video on how to prepare your resin kit to know what to do if a problem arises from the parts. Cleaning the model was done using an old tooth brush (clean it first for hygiene sake) and a tub of warm water with washing up liquid. Since the model may have some greasy surfaces on the parts (the shiny surfaces that feels greasy), it’s best to remove with warm water and scrubbed with a tooth brush. This is important when it comes to priming your model, it will not apply well on said greasy surfaces. For a best outcome, leave the model parts in warm water over night, or for a day if it’s bigger parts.

Once left over time and taken out to dry for about an hour or so, the model should be ready for priming.

Painting Sevatar

The colour scheme I’ve used for Sevatar and the base were done by painting Sevatar first, then the base and the diorama base. This way, I wouldn’t have to worry about making any mistakes as I’m working from top down, rather than base to top. Painting Sevatar was done using the Night Lords Legion colour scheme in ‘How to paint Citadel miniatures: Burning of Prospero’, with some minor changes and additional colours. I used it as my main guide to painting a Night Lords Legion colour scheme, along with some visual inspiration which I’ve referenced in my mind.

Most of these visual imagery are from Neil Roberts artwork in the HH series, and FW own painted model of Sevatar.

Armour-

  • Basecoat the model in Matt black primer, followed by two thin coats of Kantor Blue.
  • Shade the recesses with Nul Oil.
  • Highlight the edges and lightning cracks with Ailotic Blue.
  • Finish off the armour with an edge highlight of Lothren Blue for the edge points and cracks for the lightning effect. Then a final touch up of Model colour Off-White for the thunder cracks.

Eye lenses-

  • Paint Model colour Off-White on the the eyes lenses, two or three coats may need to be applied for consistency.
  • Use Lahima Matt mixed with 1/3 Model colour Off-White and Model colour Plastic green. The paint should be translucent like water, and apply it with a small brush on the white eye lenses.

Bronze-

  • Basecoat the armour trims white a mix of Model colour Brass and Model Colour Brown (1/2)
  • Shade the bronze with Reikland Fleshade.
  • Edge highlight the trims with Model colour Brass.

Winged helmet-

  • Basecoat the wings in Khorne Red.
  • Shade using Reikland Fleshade.
  • Highlight the wings with Evil Sunz Red.
  • Final edge highlight of Ryza rust.

Skulls-

  • Basecoat the the skulls in Model colour Off-White.
  • Shade the skulls in Reikland Fleshade.
  • Final highlight of Model colour Off-White.

Cloak-

  • Basecoat the cloak in Model colour Flat Brown.
  • Shade the cloak in Reikland Fleshade.
  • Mix 1/3 Model colour Off-White and Flat Brown as a highlight.
  • Finally, add more Model colour Off-White to the mix as a edge highlight.

weapons/ silver areas-

  • Basecoat the blades and silver areas in Model colour Boltgun metal.
  • Shade the areas in Nul Oil.

After painting Sevatar, he ended up like this……

I like the dark blue armour as it’s very simple to achieve without any complex colour scheme. The contrast of colours benefits the model appearance without it looking too dull and confusing.

My goal was to stay true to the source material of visual depictions of Sevatar, but also try to improve my painting skills to a finer quality. I’ve just about achieved it, but a I think I could’ve improved on painting the chain glaive as it lacks much colour variety to make it look appealing visually (but Blood for the Blood God at least makes it look interesting).

I think I’ll finish this post off here, as I don’t like to drag the post on too long. However, I hope you guys have enjoyed this post and found something new today! Any suggestions and feed back is much appreciated.

Oh and before I finish this post, something for the Dark Angels to look at 😏………..

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Thank you for reading this post. If you have any questions, post a comment below and I’ll reply back as soon as I can. Thanks!

-Bjorn

Inquisitor warband, Silence of the Shroud (Ordo Hereticus) part 4

My name is Malhett, and I’m the last of the original son’s of Prospero. The day when Prospero had fallen was the day my legion died by the wolves of Fenris. They mercilessly slaughtered my brothers with their incessant pride like a pack of hungry wolves, ready to tear our throats with savage satisfaction. Me and my brothers couldn’t hold the ‘Space Wolves’ at bay, so we we fled to the safest way we could. Our options were limited, we would never be able to reach our primarch in time as back up, nor would we be alive if we stayed on our dying world.

Our only option was to flee on our arcane craft away from Prospero. At first we left our planets orbit with ease, but then the wolves followed us with their weapons armed and loaded. Our craft was hit as we we’re about to jump into warp space, making our ships course go off its projected path way by the navigators. Thankfully we were able to exit the warp, and came out into the solar system to holy Terra itself. We might just be able to warn the Emporer of Horus’s betrayal and our Primarchs innocence in time.

But we were too late, 9,000 years later………

My memory after warp transition was hazy, I can only remember being knocked out after our ship was surrounded. The onboard incomes were humans of Terra, but bear iconography that I’ve never seen before. My last memory of the event before I became unconscious was seeing that symbol, an single ‘I’ in red with a skull in the middel of the icon.

My brothers and I were interrogated for what felt like an eternity from our captors interrogation attempts. All of my brothers onboard the ship had died from interrogation, except for me, the last son of Prospero.

8,000 years later, I was proven to be loyal to the Imperium and the Emporer. However, the sins of my legion are hung upon my shoulders and must pay the price for its heresy. I was assigned to join an inquisition warband named ‘the Silence of the Shroud’, lead by Inquisitor Heralock. My role is simply to fight until I fall on my last breath, to atone for my legions heresy.

However, if I do not die in battle, a worse fate will befall me by the ‘change’…….

Bearing the legion symbols of a forgotten age, Malhett is a rusting relic that will never be remembered once he finally falls. Either by a killing blow from battle against the Imperiums enemies, or be consumed by the ‘change’ and become a warp tainted monstrosity.
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I hope you have enjoyed this post. If you have any questions, post a comment below and I’ll reply back as soon as I can. Thanks!

-Bjorndovah