#Fembruary challenge 2020

First things first, this is my first time entering a blogging community challenge, it took me awhile but I’ve finally got the courage to start.

Second thing is, I ain’t that good at painting feminine miniatures.

But hey, that’s what challenges are for, to test yourself and overcome areas that your not comfortable at.

If you don’t know what the Fembruary challenge is, it’s a yearly challenge set up by a blogger named Alex, also known as leadballoony. The challenge is to paint a female miniature in February, from any genre and any miniature company you like.

For more information on the challenge, here’s a link to Alex’s blog post. http://leadballoony.com/2020/02/03/leadballoonys-3rd-fembruary-challenge/

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So what am I painting for Fembruary? Well I’ve already painted my first female miniature as part of a unit that I did today. A unit of Castigators for my revamped Stormhost (that I’ll elaborate in detail once I’ve finished writing the lore post. Not long now!).

Ignore the two male Stormcast Eternals, the female miniature is on the right.

Is that it? No, I’ve got another female model to paint next week! Since I’m collecting the Mortal Realms magazine to build up my existing Stormhosts (my revamped one and the Anvils of the Heldenhammer). I’m hoping my newsagent will be able to reserve next Wednesday copy as it will have the exclusive female Knight-Incantor miniature.

If they can’t reserve it due to high demand, I have a plan B! But I’ll share that at another time.

Before I go, just as a sneak peak to my big lore post on my homebrew Stormhost, I have a digital artwork of one of my characters thats a female Lord-Arcanum. #Fembruary2020

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Another bot painted

Today I’ve got another Transformers toy to show you guys, I’ve forgotten the name of this particular one, but it was part of a duo set I got over a decade ago. This one was one of my top ten favourite Deception toys because of its design and flexible poses, it’s simple but visually awesome as a villain toy. I wasn’t a fan of the alternate mode as it looked pretty generic, but I can forgive it in terms of its design.

What let’s this toy down is the coloured plastic as it looked plain with a lot of details sadly hidden by its plain colour application. Like Quake, it just lacked that extra detail and eye popping presence that would’ve made it come to life.

With my paints, brush and inks I went to work on this toy. Here’s the results!

Now it looks really impressive with more features visible and highlighted, vents, doors, mechanical lines and parts defined for a crisper finish. I went the extra mile by adding drybrushing effects for the mud that would be part of the vehicle mode, and rust texture to represent its duo state of a disused military vehicle and the Decepticons long drenched life in a never ending war. Bullet holes, rust and grime show an aspect of experience and decay fighting against the Autobots.

Other parts I’ve painted were the gun, which I used from Quake’s toy, giving it a much more realistic paint job.

For the vehicle mode the mud and rust would be seen in the point of view as an old military vehicle left to rust in a museum or scrap site. This would help the Decepticon blend in to disguise itself in abandoned places, situating itself near military bases to either surprise attack the humans or collect intel back to base.

That’s all from me for today. I might do one more toy to paint if I can find any suitable candidate. I might risk one toy in particular that Beast Wars fans will either hate or love the finished results.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Boosting the Iron Warriors Deathguard Project

The week before, I started my Summer of Hobbying project collection showcase, an up to date posts on how the project is so for and what’s next. One post in particular was my passion project for my last Chaos army, the Iron Warriors Death Guard. A combination of the Death Guard aesthetics and model range mixed with the trench warfare/ siege demolition masters of the Iron Warriors. A mixture of diseases, despair, corruption, decomposition, rust and decay with grime, blood, hard work, single minded, paranoid, reliable tools, hard as iron from within and without.

As I was sorting out my model storage last week, I found my other smaller Death Guard project, the Harbinger Legion. This was originally my main Death Guard collection that was connected to my renegade Chaos Space marine army.

Here’s some old photos of the Harbinger Legion army models that I’ll be repainting, apologies for the terrible photo quality.

This year I got the Know no Fear Starter set and used the Death Guard in the set for a new project. This later proved to be a good choice in my opinion as the quality of painting was far better than my previous work on the DG, as well as the concept of using the Iron Warriors colour scheme added a lot more character to the project.

This is my current collection gathering of Iron Warrior Death Guard.

Therefore I’ve decided to now focus on getting all of my DG Harbinger Legion models repainted, and added to my Iron Warriors project. This way I can add more models to the Iron Warriors project to make it bigger and more diverse with different unit options.

This is part one of two posts of all of my repainted Death Guard models for this project. Below I have a Chaos Lord in Terminator Armour, a Malignant Plaguecaster, Mythitic Blight hauler, Helbrute, poxwalkers and a Daemon Prince of Nurgle.

That’s all for today. I’ll be posting the next part in a couple of days showing my final few repainted models.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Contrast paints part III, the end of the Scythes

I’ve been doing some more experiments with contrast paints, mostly on Space marine models to create battle ready standard for the Scythes of the Emperor chapter. Now I have finally found a colour scheme that fits perfectly for the Scythes gold and black colour scheme. My previous experiments were a test to see how contrast works and how I can use it at its best. It’s led to now where I’ve now got the hang of painting this inky transparent paint.

Not too bold, not too dull, just the right colours for a battle ready Scythes of the Emperor Space marine. Whilst many collectors of the chapter would prefer to paint the gold yellow as a bright yellow (no reason not to if you prefer to paint it that way), however, I prefer to use a metallic gold coating (based on an artwork from the Space marine battles: Scythes of the Emperor book written by L J Goulding).

Here’s a comparison of two marines using two different base layers for contrast paint. The mini marine had been basecoated all in a light silver spray paint. Whilst the other was done with Grey Seer for the black areas, whilst for the gold I used Ironbreaker for a metallic look.

The difference between the models is quite interesting, ones more lighter than the other using Nazdreg Yellow (Primaris version has foundation white drybrush). But the application of Black Templar has different results, either a metallic iron or a smooth grey black finish (I’ve drybrushed Dawnstone over the black areas for the Primaris raise the edges).

That’s all for today. I hope you have enjoyed this latest post on my Contrast paint experiment, I might plan more soon (Flesh Tearers anyone?).

Until next time,

-Bjorn

More Contrast to contrast the last post on the new Citadel Contrast paints

I’ve done some more experiments with Citadel Contrast paints after learning from last posts outcome. I wanted to try more out using a new colour of Black Templar, and see how that work on metallic and none metallic surfaces.

But first, here’s a pretty cool model I painted using drybrushing effect and contrast on top. The model was primed in a matt black undercoat, followed by a layer (top) in Grey Seer and a drybrushed going down. Finally, I did the same using Model Colour Foundation White lightly over Grey Seer, before finally applying Contrast Nazdreg Yellow with Foundation white as edge highlights.

As you can see, the contrast paint tints the lighter areas of the model, giving the model this light glow effect. Great as a none metallic gold colour, Hammers of Sigmar Stormcast Eternals will look great using this technique.

I did a Primaris Space marine too, a small test to try out both contrast, and metallic black surface effect suggested by the GW Citadel paint app.

Not my best, but it was worth testing out. I think edge highlighting will always be an issue for me when it comes to black basecoats, I seem to be pretty bad at it.

I did one other little experiments using contrast in different basecoats, and seeing how they looked on different size and forms of miniatures.

Finally, I’ve started a mini project painting a chapter I’d usually find difficult to paint, the Scythes of the Emperor. Colours like yellow and black aren’t my strong points in painting, yellow being hard to paint and black being hard to edge highlight (drybrushing works better for me).

But contrast seems to have at least made my models look decent, if a little rough from the pooling. Just to paint out that these models were painted before, the results shown may not look as blotchy as unpainted grey plastic marines.

Thats it for now, more posts will be up pretty soon on my progress with the Scythes of the Emperor mini project. If you have any suggestions, post in the comment section and I’ll reply back as soon as I can.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Experimenting with Contrast paint

I haven’t said anything about contrast at all on my blog, that is until now. I was sceptical about this paint since it was first revealed at Warhammer fest, was it really as good as they say it is?

After watching a couple of Warhammer community videos, pro painter opinions and photos of the finished products, I had some hope. A paint that can give both the recess shade and base colour in one coat.

However, I was unsure about the paints as when images came up on painted Primaris Space Marines in various colours, the models looked very patchy in pool dry marks. Kinda defeats the purpose of a one coat paint if it looks like pooled mess.

When I finally got my contrast paint today, I did some experiments to see what kind of results I can get from this new Citadel paint.

I used Nazdreg yellow contrast for all of my experiments, using Grey Seer Basecoat, Model Colour foundation white as a Basecoat and for drybrushing.

Here’s what I’ve learnt.

First my first experiment I used a Tyranid Gargoyle as they have many surfaces to test our contrast, from deep recesses, details and flat areas. I started my painting by using Grey Seer as a basecoat (three coats) then I applied Nazdreg yellow over the model. This resulted in a patchy look just like the Primaris Space marine pictures from Warhammer Fest.

Despite this, I then highlighted the model in Model Colour Foundation White, making it look nearly like a none metallic gold look.

For the left side of the wings, I used Leadbelcher as a basecoat, then I applied Nazdreg yellow over it. This surprisingly looked really cool, like a gold tint that could be useful for future painting work. On the right carapace side I used the contrast paint again over the first layer and the white highlight. Resulting in a darker gold yellow tone whilst retaining the edge highlight Which you can see below. It’s similar to how AoS studio manager, Jes Bickham, painted his Tyranid army (I think it was called Hive Epemedis?) using mustard yellow colours for the carapace.

From this second contrast application an idea formed in my head, why not use Grey Seer as a Basecoat and drybrush Model Colour Foundation white? Here’s what the results were.

You’ll notice that the raised areas are more lighter yellow, whilst some areas are darker that haven’t been drybrushed in white. It works well for scales which has shading, base colour and highlights all in one application of contrast.

With this test of using white pant for contrast I did one more experiment using both Grey Seer and Foundation white on two sides of a Space marine.

The pooling problem was less noticeable on the lighter side than the Grey Seer basecoat. Left side was fine in foundation white whilst the right side was done in Grey Seer.

Contrast paint using Grey Seer basecoat.

Contrast paint using Model Colour Foundation White.

I think using Foundation white for Nazdreg yellow contrast would be really beneficial for painters who find it hard painting Bad Moons and Imperial Fist armies. It’s a one coat solution to a process that would take a long time to paint, but contrast has proven, to me at least, that this is no longer an issue.

That’s all I have for today. This isn’t a review on contrast paint as I think it’ll take some time to form an informative review on contrast paints. There’s still a lot of experimentation to try out, even pro painters are coming up with new stuff every day using contrast paints. I’ve heard that the Alpha Legion contrast method is a favourite in my local GW store that I overheard from the manager.

I hope this post serves as an inspiration or an informative look at how contrast paint works. If you like what you see and want more contrast posts, post a comment below and I’ll continue to experiment even more!

Until next time,

-Bjorn