Boosting the Iron Warriors Deathguard Project

The week before, I started my Summer of Hobbying project collection showcase, an up to date posts on how the project is so for and what’s next. One post in particular was my passion project for my last Chaos army, the Iron Warriors Death Guard. A combination of the Death Guard aesthetics and model range mixed with the trench warfare/ siege demolition masters of the Iron Warriors. A mixture of diseases, despair, corruption, decomposition, rust and decay with grime, blood, hard work, single minded, paranoid, reliable tools, hard as iron from within and without.

As I was sorting out my model storage last week, I found my other smaller Death Guard project, the Harbinger Legion. This was originally my main Death Guard collection that was connected to my renegade Chaos Space marine army.

Here’s some old photos of the Harbinger Legion army models that I’ll be repainting, apologies for the terrible photo quality.

This year I got the Know no Fear Starter set and used the Death Guard in the set for a new project. This later proved to be a good choice in my opinion as the quality of painting was far better than my previous work on the DG, as well as the concept of using the Iron Warriors colour scheme added a lot more character to the project.

This is my current collection gathering of Iron Warrior Death Guard.

Therefore I’ve decided to now focus on getting all of my DG Harbinger Legion models repainted, and added to my Iron Warriors project. This way I can add more models to the Iron Warriors project to make it bigger and more diverse with different unit options.

This is part one of two posts of all of my repainted Death Guard models for this project. Below I have a Chaos Lord in Terminator Armour, a Malignant Plaguecaster, Mythitic Blight hauler, Helbrute, poxwalkers and a Daemon Prince of Nurgle.

That’s all for today. I’ll be posting the next part in a couple of days showing my final few repainted models.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

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Contrast paints part III, the end of the Scythes

I’ve been doing some more experiments with contrast paints, mostly on Space marine models to create battle ready standard for the Scythes of the Emperor chapter. Now I have finally found a colour scheme that fits perfectly for the Scythes gold and black colour scheme. My previous experiments were a test to see how contrast works and how I can use it at its best. It’s led to now where I’ve now got the hang of painting this inky transparent paint.

Not too bold, not too dull, just the right colours for a battle ready Scythes of the Emperor Space marine. Whilst many collectors of the chapter would prefer to paint the gold yellow as a bright yellow (no reason not to if you prefer to paint it that way), however, I prefer to use a metallic gold coating (based on an artwork from the Space marine battles: Scythes of the Emperor book written by L J Goulding).

Here’s a comparison of two marines using two different base layers for contrast paint. The mini marine had been basecoated all in a light silver spray paint. Whilst the other was done with Grey Seer for the black areas, whilst for the gold I used Ironbreaker for a metallic look.

The difference between the models is quite interesting, ones more lighter than the other using Nazdreg Yellow (Primaris version has foundation white drybrush). But the application of Black Templar has different results, either a metallic iron or a smooth grey black finish (I’ve drybrushed Dawnstone over the black areas for the Primaris raise the edges).

That’s all for today. I hope you have enjoyed this latest post on my Contrast paint experiment, I might plan more soon (Flesh Tearers anyone?).

Until next time,

-Bjorn

More Contrast to contrast the last post on the new Citadel Contrast paints

I’ve done some more experiments with Citadel Contrast paints after learning from last posts outcome. I wanted to try more out using a new colour of Black Templar, and see how that work on metallic and none metallic surfaces.

But first, here’s a pretty cool model I painted using drybrushing effect and contrast on top. The model was primed in a matt black undercoat, followed by a layer (top) in Grey Seer and a drybrushed going down. Finally, I did the same using Model Colour Foundation White lightly over Grey Seer, before finally applying Contrast Nazdreg Yellow with Foundation white as edge highlights.

As you can see, the contrast paint tints the lighter areas of the model, giving the model this light glow effect. Great as a none metallic gold colour, Hammers of Sigmar Stormcast Eternals will look great using this technique.

I did a Primaris Space marine too, a small test to try out both contrast, and metallic black surface effect suggested by the GW Citadel paint app.

Not my best, but it was worth testing out. I think edge highlighting will always be an issue for me when it comes to black basecoats, I seem to be pretty bad at it.

I did one other little experiments using contrast in different basecoats, and seeing how they looked on different size and forms of miniatures.

Finally, I’ve started a mini project painting a chapter I’d usually find difficult to paint, the Scythes of the Emperor. Colours like yellow and black aren’t my strong points in painting, yellow being hard to paint and black being hard to edge highlight (drybrushing works better for me).

But contrast seems to have at least made my models look decent, if a little rough from the pooling. Just to paint out that these models were painted before, the results shown may not look as blotchy as unpainted grey plastic marines.

Thats it for now, more posts will be up pretty soon on my progress with the Scythes of the Emperor mini project. If you have any suggestions, post in the comment section and I’ll reply back as soon as I can.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Experimenting with Contrast paint

I haven’t said anything about contrast at all on my blog, that is until now. I was sceptical about this paint since it was first revealed at Warhammer fest, was it really as good as they say it is?

After watching a couple of Warhammer community videos, pro painter opinions and photos of the finished products, I had some hope. A paint that can give both the recess shade and base colour in one coat.

However, I was unsure about the paints as when images came up on painted Primaris Space Marines in various colours, the models looked very patchy in pool dry marks. Kinda defeats the purpose of a one coat paint if it looks like pooled mess.

When I finally got my contrast paint today, I did some experiments to see what kind of results I can get from this new Citadel paint.

I used Nazdreg yellow contrast for all of my experiments, using Grey Seer Basecoat, Model Colour foundation white as a Basecoat and for drybrushing.

Here’s what I’ve learnt.

First my first experiment I used a Tyranid Gargoyle as they have many surfaces to test our contrast, from deep recesses, details and flat areas. I started my painting by using Grey Seer as a basecoat (three coats) then I applied Nazdreg yellow over the model. This resulted in a patchy look just like the Primaris Space marine pictures from Warhammer Fest.

Despite this, I then highlighted the model in Model Colour Foundation White, making it look nearly like a none metallic gold look.

For the left side of the wings, I used Leadbelcher as a basecoat, then I applied Nazdreg yellow over it. This surprisingly looked really cool, like a gold tint that could be useful for future painting work. On the right carapace side I used the contrast paint again over the first layer and the white highlight. Resulting in a darker gold yellow tone whilst retaining the edge highlight Which you can see below. It’s similar to how AoS studio manager, Jes Bickham, painted his Tyranid army (I think it was called Hive Epemedis?) using mustard yellow colours for the carapace.

From this second contrast application an idea formed in my head, why not use Grey Seer as a Basecoat and drybrush Model Colour Foundation white? Here’s what the results were.

You’ll notice that the raised areas are more lighter yellow, whilst some areas are darker that haven’t been drybrushed in white. It works well for scales which has shading, base colour and highlights all in one application of contrast.

With this test of using white pant for contrast I did one more experiment using both Grey Seer and Foundation white on two sides of a Space marine.

The pooling problem was less noticeable on the lighter side than the Grey Seer basecoat. Left side was fine in foundation white whilst the right side was done in Grey Seer.

Contrast paint using Grey Seer basecoat.

Contrast paint using Model Colour Foundation White.

I think using Foundation white for Nazdreg yellow contrast would be really beneficial for painters who find it hard painting Bad Moons and Imperial Fist armies. It’s a one coat solution to a process that would take a long time to paint, but contrast has proven, to me at least, that this is no longer an issue.

That’s all I have for today. This isn’t a review on contrast paint as I think it’ll take some time to form an informative review on contrast paints. There’s still a lot of experimentation to try out, even pro painters are coming up with new stuff every day using contrast paints. I’ve heard that the Alpha Legion contrast method is a favourite in my local GW store that I overheard from the manager.

I hope this post serves as an inspiration or an informative look at how contrast paint works. If you like what you see and want more contrast posts, post a comment below and I’ll continue to experiment even more!

Until next time,

-Bjorn

How to paint Iron Warriors (with Nurgle‚Äôs Blessing)

In today’s post, I’m going to share my colour scheme for painting Iron Warriors with a mix of Nurgle influence. I’ll be splitting the colour guide into separate sections for simplicity and finding sections you might want to experiment with your own collections.

I managed to get over a week worth of painting done for all the models seen above, however, it might be less for you as I took time trying to decide what colours I was going to use! The aim of the project was staying true to the Iron Warriors recognisable silver, black and gold armour colours, but also making sure the Nurgle corruption wasn’t too cartoony (colour) and looked (u)natural in mutation.

I was Inspired by the art of Warhammer 40k/30k seen in GW publications and White Dwarf magazines. I used the Visions of Heresy art book as my guideline for getting the general idea of the image of the IV legion. Audio wise I’ve listened to two BL stories about the Iron Warriors, Primarch series: Perturabo by Guy Haley and Iron and Stone by Robbie Mcniven. These two fulled my inspiration to work harder at painting, which is exactly what Perturabo expects.

Paints

Before I share my painting processes, I’ve listed all the paints I’ve used for the project. Paints with ‘MC’ stands for Model Color paints, which I’ve shorten for simplicity.

  • Kantor Blue
  • Khorne Red
  • Hellion Green
  • Warboss Green
  • (MC) Refractive Green
  • Abaddon Black
  • Lahiman Medium
  • Reikland Fleshade
  • Averland Sunset
  • Leadbelcher
  • Retributor Gold
  • Nililkh Oxide
  • Typhus Corrosion
  • Kabalite Green
  • Sybarite Green
  • Nurgles Rot
  • Screamer Pink
  • Pink Horror
  • Emperors Children
  • (MC) Flat Red
  • (MC) Flat Brown
  • (MC) Foundation White
  • Zandria Dust
  • Ushabti Bone
  • Martian Desert

Painting Plague marine

Silver Armour

  1. Basecoat Abaddon Black
  2. Drybrush Leadbelcher
  3. Shade mix Abaddon Black and Lahiman Medium
  4. Drybrush Leadbelcher

Gold Trim

  1. Basecoat Retributor Gold
  2. Shade Reikland Fleshade
  3. Drybrush Leadbelcher
  4. Add Nililakh Oxide and Typhus Corrosion for added rust effect

Warped Skin

  1. Basecoat Kabalite Green
  2. Shade Reikland Fleshade
  3. Drybrush Sybarite Green
  4. Lightly drybrush Hellion Green
  5. Apply watered down Nurgle’s Rot

Pink bio-tubes

  1. Basecoat Screamer Pink
  2. Shade Reikland Fleshade
  3. Drybrush Pink Horror
  4. Drybrush Emperors Children
  5. Apply watered down Nurgle’s Rot

Red Cape

  1. Basecoat Khorne Red/ or MC Flat Brown
  1. Shade mix Abaddon Black and Lahiman Medium
  2. Drybrush Khorne Red
  3. Drybrush MC Flat Red

Eye Lenses

  1. Basecoat MC Foundation White
  2. Shade mix Khorne Red and Lahiman Medium
  3. Make small white dots at the corner of the lenses

Plague Swords

  1. Basecoat Abaddon Black
  2. Drybrush Warboss Green
  3. Lightly drybrush Hellion Green

Bone/ Teeth

  1. Basecoat Zandria Dust
  2. Shade Reikland Fleshade
  3. Drybrush Ushabti Bone

Desert Base

  1. Basecoat MC Refractive Green
  2. Apply loads of Martian Desert on the base
  3. Drybrush Zandria Dust
  4. Apply patches of PVA glue and add green flock to the base for added environment effect.

Chevron

  1. Basecoat Averland Sunset
  2. Apply Shade of Reikland Fleshade
  3. Carefully apply Abaddon Black lines on the area in parallel lines
  4. Mix Averland Sunset and MC Foundation White
  5. Mix Abaddon Black and Lahiman Medium at the edges of the area

Rust

  1. Apply Typhus Corrosion on the desired area
  2. Drybrush Ryza Rust

Blue Plague Smoke

  1. Basecoat Zandria Dust
  2. Drybrush MC Foundation White
  3. Mix Kantor Blue and Lahiman Medium as a shade
  4. Drybrush MC Foundation White

Poxwalkers

For Poxwalkers, they have similar colour schemes as the Plague marines, however, they have a different colour scheme for skin.

Poxwalkers skin

  1. Basecoat Abaddon Black
  2. Drybrush MC Refractive Green
  3. Drybrush Warboss Green
  4. Lightly Drybrush Hellion Green

~~~~~~~~~~

I hope this guide will be useful for your painting of Iron Warrior models, or even an entirely different painting project. If you have any questions or suggestions, post a comment below and I’ll reply back as soon as I can.

Until next time!

-Bjorn