Contrast paints part III, the end of the Scythes

I’ve been doing some more experiments with contrast paints, mostly on Space marine models to create battle ready standard for the Scythes of the Emperor chapter. Now I have finally found a colour scheme that fits perfectly for the Scythes gold and black colour scheme. My previous experiments were a test to see how contrast works and how I can use it at its best. It’s led to now where I’ve now got the hang of painting this inky transparent paint.

Not too bold, not too dull, just the right colours for a battle ready Scythes of the Emperor Space marine. Whilst many collectors of the chapter would prefer to paint the gold yellow as a bright yellow (no reason not to if you prefer to paint it that way), however, I prefer to use a metallic gold coating (based on an artwork from the Space marine battles: Scythes of the Emperor book written by L J Goulding).

Here’s a comparison of two marines using two different base layers for contrast paint. The mini marine had been basecoated all in a light silver spray paint. Whilst the other was done with Grey Seer for the black areas, whilst for the gold I used Ironbreaker for a metallic look.

The difference between the models is quite interesting, ones more lighter than the other using Nazdreg Yellow (Primaris version has foundation white drybrush). But the application of Black Templar has different results, either a metallic iron or a smooth grey black finish (I’ve drybrushed Dawnstone over the black areas for the Primaris raise the edges).

That’s all for today. I hope you have enjoyed this latest post on my Contrast paint experiment, I might plan more soon (Flesh Tearers anyone?).

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Advertisements

More Contrast to contrast the last post on the new Citadel Contrast paints

I’ve done some more experiments with Citadel Contrast paints after learning from last posts outcome. I wanted to try more out using a new colour of Black Templar, and see how that work on metallic and none metallic surfaces.

But first, here’s a pretty cool model I painted using drybrushing effect and contrast on top. The model was primed in a matt black undercoat, followed by a layer (top) in Grey Seer and a drybrushed going down. Finally, I did the same using Model Colour Foundation White lightly over Grey Seer, before finally applying Contrast Nazdreg Yellow with Foundation white as edge highlights.

As you can see, the contrast paint tints the lighter areas of the model, giving the model this light glow effect. Great as a none metallic gold colour, Hammers of Sigmar Stormcast Eternals will look great using this technique.

I did a Primaris Space marine too, a small test to try out both contrast, and metallic black surface effect suggested by the GW Citadel paint app.

Not my best, but it was worth testing out. I think edge highlighting will always be an issue for me when it comes to black basecoats, I seem to be pretty bad at it.

I did one other little experiments using contrast in different basecoats, and seeing how they looked on different size and forms of miniatures.

Finally, I’ve started a mini project painting a chapter I’d usually find difficult to paint, the Scythes of the Emperor. Colours like yellow and black aren’t my strong points in painting, yellow being hard to paint and black being hard to edge highlight (drybrushing works better for me).

But contrast seems to have at least made my models look decent, if a little rough from the pooling. Just to paint out that these models were painted before, the results shown may not look as blotchy as unpainted grey plastic marines.

Thats it for now, more posts will be up pretty soon on my progress with the Scythes of the Emperor mini project. If you have any suggestions, post in the comment section and I’ll reply back as soon as I can.

Until next time,

-Bjorn

Experimenting with Contrast paint

I haven’t said anything about contrast at all on my blog, that is until now. I was sceptical about this paint since it was first revealed at Warhammer fest, was it really as good as they say it is?

After watching a couple of Warhammer community videos, pro painter opinions and photos of the finished products, I had some hope. A paint that can give both the recess shade and base colour in one coat.

However, I was unsure about the paints as when images came up on painted Primaris Space Marines in various colours, the models looked very patchy in pool dry marks. Kinda defeats the purpose of a one coat paint if it looks like pooled mess.

When I finally got my contrast paint today, I did some experiments to see what kind of results I can get from this new Citadel paint.

I used Nazdreg yellow contrast for all of my experiments, using Grey Seer Basecoat, Model Colour foundation white as a Basecoat and for drybrushing.

Here’s what I’ve learnt.

First my first experiment I used a Tyranid Gargoyle as they have many surfaces to test our contrast, from deep recesses, details and flat areas. I started my painting by using Grey Seer as a basecoat (three coats) then I applied Nazdreg yellow over the model. This resulted in a patchy look just like the Primaris Space marine pictures from Warhammer Fest.

Despite this, I then highlighted the model in Model Colour Foundation White, making it look nearly like a none metallic gold look.

For the left side of the wings, I used Leadbelcher as a basecoat, then I applied Nazdreg yellow over it. This surprisingly looked really cool, like a gold tint that could be useful for future painting work. On the right carapace side I used the contrast paint again over the first layer and the white highlight. Resulting in a darker gold yellow tone whilst retaining the edge highlight Which you can see below. It’s similar to how AoS studio manager, Jes Bickham, painted his Tyranid army (I think it was called Hive Epemedis?) using mustard yellow colours for the carapace.

From this second contrast application an idea formed in my head, why not use Grey Seer as a Basecoat and drybrush Model Colour Foundation white? Here’s what the results were.

You’ll notice that the raised areas are more lighter yellow, whilst some areas are darker that haven’t been drybrushed in white. It works well for scales which has shading, base colour and highlights all in one application of contrast.

With this test of using white pant for contrast I did one more experiment using both Grey Seer and Foundation white on two sides of a Space marine.

The pooling problem was less noticeable on the lighter side than the Grey Seer basecoat. Left side was fine in foundation white whilst the right side was done in Grey Seer.

Contrast paint using Grey Seer basecoat.

Contrast paint using Model Colour Foundation White.

I think using Foundation white for Nazdreg yellow contrast would be really beneficial for painters who find it hard painting Bad Moons and Imperial Fist armies. It’s a one coat solution to a process that would take a long time to paint, but contrast has proven, to me at least, that this is no longer an issue.

That’s all I have for today. This isn’t a review on contrast paint as I think it’ll take some time to form an informative review on contrast paints. There’s still a lot of experimentation to try out, even pro painters are coming up with new stuff every day using contrast paints. I’ve heard that the Alpha Legion contrast method is a favourite in my local GW store that I overheard from the manager.

I hope this post serves as an inspiration or an informative look at how contrast paint works. If you like what you see and want more contrast posts, post a comment below and I’ll continue to experiment even more!

Until next time,

-Bjorn

The Jester and the Knight

This week I’ve found two Codex’s at two far away locations in the same city, how weird is that? Well, by Tzeentch’s many webs of plots and events, I found both Imperial Knights (7th ed) and Codex Eldar: Harlequins (7th ed) in pretty good condition.

It’s weird, why do I keep finding these things when I’m not looking for them? For two fairly recent publications to be in second hand shops is rare. Rouge Trader was still on display at an expensive cost of £45, no one’s taking that book anytime soon.

There were some other Codex’s, but they weren’t that interesting for me, I’ll let someone else take the Grey Knights and Tyranids………..

What’s odd is the pricing. So when I got the Imperial Knights Codex it costed £3.65, a massive reduction compared to the Rouge Trader book which was £45, and a Forge World book I saw that was roughly £15 est. in fact most of the Codex’s I’ve seen were at the same price apart from one or two that were £4.35 est.

Now at another location in the same city, the Harlequins Codex was £1.45, the condition was great apart from some small dent marks that aren’t really noticeable on the front cover. Although, the shop last year did have an 8th edition Orks and Goblins army book at £12.50 and a Warmachine faction book at £22.

I have no idea why these second hand charity shops price the books for a fairly decent price cut, considering these are not that old from publication. I’m grateful don’t get me wrong, but I’m curious to know why the prices have dropped so much for second hand.

Lately I’ve been reading some old Warhammer 40k lore (I think it was 3rd or 4th edition Imperialis book?) on the Adeptus Arbites, the law and order of the Imperium. I wish GW would release some plastic judges so I can make a Kill Team, based on the Judges from the Judge Dredd universe. Just imagine it, a squad of law enforcement going against a Genestealer cult in the Crypts of a Hive city.

Anyways, that’s all I have for today. I might have more to show soon, depending on wether the charity shops still have some Codex left for me to hunt down (no promises).

until next time,

-Bjorn

Horror Harvest: James Herbert The Fog

I’ve now decided to theme my horror reading book blog posts under the ‘Horror Harvest’ title, so it will be like a series of sorts with a nice artwork.

Before I begin with The Fog, I’d like to thank IRO (Imperial Rebel Ork) and The Fly on the Wall podcast, for taking my suggestions for their podcast topics. They did a brilliant podcast on the Subject of James Herbert, and what book they enjoyed the most.

The podcast is like an all sorts show ranging from different topics from funny and serious subjects. Its great for long bus trips (they can take ages so a good hour of podcasting always helps!), painting miniatures, walking and anything else really.

It’s also good motivational therapy fuel for getting through paper work after paper work after paper work after paper work. Oh did I mention it’s great for getting through paper work?

If you would like to know more about the podcast and who bears the one Mocha of all Mochas, I have two links to IRO’s blog where he has the official links for where you can download the podcast.

https://imperialrebelork.wordpress.com/2019/04/24/fly-on-the-wall-podcast-plus-some-hobby-updates/

https://imperialrebelork.wordpress.com/2019/05/02/army-of-hate-second-miniature-plus-fly-on-the-wall-podcast-episode-2/

And for those of you who want to hear the James Herbert episode, links below to IRO’s post.

https://imperialrebelork.wordpress.com/2019/06/04/fly-on-the-wall-podcast-and-the-new-post-apocalyptic-saga/

Best of luck to The Fly on the Wall podcast!

__________________

Continuing on my journey reading James Herbert’s books after a colossal read of The Rats Trilogy (and the Graphic Novel), today I want to share my thoughts on The Fog. A horror story about an ominous yellow fog that appeared after a huge fissure opened up in a small village, floating away after our main protagonist saves a child whilst being trapped below the fissure gap. However, unbeknownst to the people who witnessed this strange event, the fog would go on through the land to cause madness to anyone who inhales the it.

This book unlike The Rats trilogy, is more of a horror mystery story mixed with human physiological horror. The fog itself whilst known in origin of how it came to be (no spoilers here!) It’s still a mystery as if it may or may not be sentient. Anyone who comes across the fog and inhales it becomes a single minded force of madness.

Wether by hatred, depression, love or any other emotion, the fog is just the means to create the horror as it turns both good, bad and everyday citizens.

At the core of the fog there is an unatural light which seems to draw people closer, as if it wants them. It also seems to rest at places of convince for safety, say inside a church, a rail tunnel or an underground motorway. Overtime this fog grows in size as it feeds off carbon dioxide, becoming as big as a town.

The story focuses more on human psychology, when the mind slowly deteriorates making the person more savage with madness. Usually the person affected will either eventually die from their minds deteriorating, or commit suicide.

Our main protagonist, Holman, is the first to be affected by the fog after he escapes from the fissure. For weeks he was classed as clinically insane as he became a mad man, until weeks later his sanity came back whilst being placed in a mental health facility.

At first it was assumed that he was diagnosed with PTSD from the fissure incident, but later on through the story it’s revealed that the fog had cause this sudden personality change. This would be proven true as several incidents of strange murders are all linked to the yellow ghastly fog.

My thoughts on the book?

As usual James Herbert writes The Fog in great detail and engaging narrative, using his human victim characters to tell their story and how the horror aspect plays into their actions. Each character has an interesting story to tell, from our main protagonist, Holman, as a survivor of the fissure. Side characters including a drunk who cares more about his pigeons than his wife, a woman who’s same sex relationship broke apart by her partners choice to be in another relationship with a man, a school teacher who’s past during the Second World War is a dark and disturbing story and a man child who decides to give his boss a message he’ll never forget.

Similar to how The Rats Trilogy was written, these short story’s in one book adds to the weight of the affects that the threat can cause as a consequence. You feel for those who don’t deserve it, but can’t stop reading the book as you find out the fate of these unfortunate victims.

By this point I’ve become pretty used to how James Herbert writes his books, nearly leaning towards predictable at times when it came to certain sub story lines and plot twist. However, this isn’t to say it’s all predictable as the finale throws a very good question during the end, and reflection on just what the Fog could be.

This was James Herbert’s second book that he published in his writing career, still in the early days when James would use excessive blood, violence, mature themes and subjects that you tend not to see in today’s literature. It’s only later on that these things would dull down as supernatural and paranormal horror stories were written.

Overall, another great book to read as a twisted but enjoyable horror story. If you’ve read James’s books before, you may find some parts of this book to be the same old stuff you’ve read before. However, it’s still worth reading if your interested in the human psychological horror genre.

__________________

Well that’s all I have for my post on The Fog. Now that I’ve read all of my current James Herbert books, and read some other books (like Eric, by the late Sir Terry Pratchett) too to broaden my ongoing reading past time. I’ve now started another book by James Herbert, this time a supernatural horror story, The Ghosts of Sleath.

until next time, mind the yellow fog,

-Bjorn

Let’s get ready to Waaaaaagggghhh!!!

Another visit to a carboot sale, another new finding! This time it’s all about da greenskins with Gorkamorka Da Uvver Book.

As an Ork collector, who amassed a Bad Moons Tribe army last year, this book is a real treat! There’s lore and background, campaign rules, modelling ideas and extra stuff too!

I’m keen to learn more about Gorkamorka and how to play it, as It could be a good afternoon game with an opponent on a rainy day. You don’t need a lot of models to play Gorkamorka, just a few models, a leader (Ork Nob) and a few vehicles.

Sadly, the basic rules were in a separate book and I couldn’t find it at the carboot stall. So I can’t really play Gotkamorka unless I can find a copy of the rules.

Some of my Bad Moons Tribe Units that I did last year, which can be used in Gorkamorka!

I’m still reading through the book learning about how the Orks crash landed on Angelis on a Space Hulk, and how the Orks started to build crazy stuff to fly back into space.

There are a lot of fun stuff in this book including some creative inspirations on how to modify your Trukk, Trakk and other vehicles. No planes sadly, but that’s because Ork planes didn’t became a physical miniature until a decade or two later.

That’s it for today, I’m going back to work painting an Exalted Chaos Champion of Khorne (Slaves to Darkness) and painting a Troggoth King.

Until next time,

-Bjorn